"We like to think we see patterns where others see chaos. We start with playful research, explorations into big themes and trends, and work with people and communities in that field – experts, universities, start-ups, designers to unpack them."
Kaave Pour, creative director at SPACE10


The task is to find the interesting patterns and move them forward into things that can be actually designed, build and test, to validate ideas and see if they're ones we should bring to the masses. Instead of trying to solve everything in one big, complex solution, Space10 crew break it down into smaller projects.
This summarises SPACE10's work, tackling big, global issues with an overarching approach of creativity and what the team calls "visual intelligence".

How does it work?


With teams researching and experimenting around three themes: Circular Societies, Co-existence and Digital Empowerment, the lab is far from the traditional model of a lumbering trend-forecasting agency producing unrealistic visions of utopia.

Relatively small, with a core team of 20 and an evolving team of freelance residents, it delves into realistic possible futures for our society and then presents its findings in art and design projects that aim to engage everyone, not just board members.

Design as a tool to tackle global society issues:

One of its current research projects taking place at the Copenhagen hub, under the Circular Societies strand, is surrounding the future of local food. The team is working with residents including a bio-engineer, a chef and a food designer, researching the potential future of how we could grow and eat sustainable, healthy food. It's about the science and practicalities, but also the look and taste.

Design can be an important tool to take big issues like climate change, pollution, and make them more visual so people can relate to them, rather than just scary headlines and big numbers. Most of the projects are open-source, with plans and research material made available online to anyone wishing to take the exploration further.

Most of the projects are open-source, with plans and research material made available online to anyone wishing to take the exploration further.
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